Production of train engines between 1870-1887

The global production of train engines was summarised in the table below:

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The most profitable companies in the domain are 4-2-2 Iron Duke and 4-4-0 8-Wheeler producers.

The producer of 2-8-0 Consolidation is coming up fast in the second half of the 1880’s decade with 9 train engines sold in 2 years.

Unfortunately, 3-Truck Shay producer is on the verge of bankruptcy with only 3 train engines sold.

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Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (VIII)

In September 1887, a new 2-8-0 Consolidation was purchased by the company ”1880 Mediteranean Rail”.

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Train engine #17 hauled two mail wagons and one produce wagon from Murcia to Valencia.

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In December 1887, the company ”1880 Mediteranean Rail” had a revenue of  2,691,000 dollars.

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Besancon Western’s revenue was 1,808,000 dollars.

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Adolph von Hansemann’s net worth was 1,140,000 dollars in December 1887.

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At the end of the year 1887, there were 23 train engines in the Mediterranean Region:

  • 7 x 4-2-2 Iron Duke (1880MR – 5; BW – 1; L&SE – 1);
  • 6 x 4-4-0 8-Wheeler (BW – 3; 1880MR – 2; L&SE – 1);
  • 9 x 2-8-0 Consolidation (1880MR – 9).
  • 1 x 2-4-0 Vulcan (1880MR – 1)

At the end of the year 1885, there were 77 train engines in the world:

  • 33 x 4-2-2 Iron Duke (THRS – 13; L&M – 7; SE – 6; 1880MR – 5; BW – 1; L&SE – 1);
  • 19 x 4-4-0 8-Wheeler (THRS – 10; BW – 3; 1880MR – 2; SE – 2; L&SE – 1; L&M – 1);
  • 16 x 2-8-0 Consolidation (THRS – 7; 1880MR – 9);
  • 3 x 3-Truck Shay (THRS – 3);
  • 6 x 2-4-0 Vulcan (THRS – 5; 1880MR – 1).

There were 37 ”4-2-2 Iron Duke” train engines produced, from which some were retired to be replaced with a newer generation of 4-2-2 Iron Duke or other train engines models – for example, THRS-#3, THRS-#4, and 1880MR-#7 (after sufferring an accident that rendered it unusable).

Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (VII)

In August 1887, ”1880 Mediteranean Rail” had a fleet of 15 train engines (five 4-2-2 Iron Duke, two 4-4-0 8-Wheeler, seven 2-8-0 Consolidation and one 2-4-0 Vulcan).

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At Montpellier Station, there were three 4-2-2 Iron Duke when the picture below was taken in August 1887.

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The only 2-4-0 Vulcan of 1880MR was heading to La Rochelle with two passenger wagons, one dining wagon and three cattle wagons.

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A roundhouse and a customs house were built at Montpellier Station in August 1887.

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At train station Murcia, one passenger wagon and one produce wagon were waiting to be hauled. Also, a customs house was built next to the post office.

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To be continued…

 

Britain – 1886 – 1887 – Will Isambard Kingdom Brunel lose control of his company T.H.R.S.? (VIII)

In December 1887, train station Dublin had available for towing a milk wagon and a food wagon.

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Train station Dublin was equipped with a roundhouse, a water tower, a sand tower, telegraph poles, a large hotel, a large restaurant, a saloon, a mail office and a liquid storage building.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel decided in the last month of year 1887 to change the dividend rate of T.H.R.S. shares from 0.20 dollars to 0.50 dollars, in order to increase his own wealth (and the other shareholders of the company).

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The Total Annual Dividends of “The Hammers Rail System” changed from 127,000 dollars to 318,000 dollars.

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At this time of the year, train engine #23 (a 2-8-0 Consolidation) was unloading three passenger wagons at Cardiff.

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In the image above we can see train engine #33 as it slowly exits the difficult steep sector near Cardiff as it is heading to Rhondda.

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At the end of the year 1887, the board of directors at T.H.R.S. increased Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s salary by 1,000 dollars, to 40,000 dollars per year (considering that the profits of the company were 5,218,000 dollars, that was a small increase).

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Despite being an year of recession, The Hammers Rail System had a revenue of 7,141,000 dollars. The competitors had smaller revenues: Southampton Eastern occupied the second position with 2.84 million dollars and the third position was taken by Liverpool & Manchester with 2.55 million dollars.

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Isambard Kingdom Brunel’s wealth was 9,276,000 dollars in 1877, and his position as CEO of T.H.R.S. was solidified despite George Hudson’s maneuvering.

At the end of the year 1887, there were 54 train engines in England:

  • 26 x 4-2-2 Iron Duke (THRS – 13; L&M – 7; SE – 6);
  • 13 x 4-4-0 8-Wheeler (THRS – 10; L&M – 1; SE – 2);
  • 7 x 2-8-0 Consolidation (THRS – 7);
  • 3 x 3-Truck Shay (THRS – 3);
  • 5 x 2-4-0 Vulcan (THRS – 5).

Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (VI)

In July 1887 the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” built a new train station, “Barcelona Junction”. Its purpose is to facilitate the maintenance – repairs, sand refills, water replenishing – for the train engines that travel on the route Valencia – Toulouse or Valencia – Montpellier (or Murcia – Montpellier/Toulouse). Those train engines bypass the city of Barcelona and the operations of maintenance must be operated before the locomotives reach the steep mountains of Pyranees.

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In one week, a roundhouse, a sanding tower, a water tower and a customs house were built at “Barcelona Junction” train station.

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In the picture below, we can see the train station “Valencia” in July 1887. It had a large hotel, a large restaurant, a saloon, a mail/post office, a customs house, a liquid storage facility (because Valencia produces oil wagons), a roundhouse, a water tower and a sanding tower. There are also telegraph poles.

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While “Valencia” has in the background the beautiful image of the sea, “Murcia” offers the sight of the Spanish mountains “Cordillera Betica”. The buildings of this station include a large hotel, a large restaurant, a saloon, a mail/post office, a warehouse, a refrigerated storage building, a roundhouse, a water tower, a sanding tower and, of course, telegraph poles.

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In July 1887, “1880 Mediteranean Rail” had cash of 1.8 million dollars. Between Barcelona Junction and Valencia there were 4 train engines, three of them carrying passengers, oil and produce to Barcelona, while the fourth one (train engine #12) was hauling three passenger wagons, a dining wagon and a mail wagon to Valencia.

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Train engine #15 (a brand new 2-8-0 Consolidation) was assigned on the route Valencia – Toulouse.

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In July 1887, train engines #14 and #15 were brand new.

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To be continued…

Britain – 1886 – 1887 – Will Isambard Kingdom Brunel lose control of his company T.H.R.S.? (VII)

Train engine #38 started its career at Dublin in October 1887 where it took four passenger wagons, one dining wagon and one mail wagon to Dundalk.

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It was a great day for Ireland, a sign of new commercial opportunities.

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In the image below, we can see train engines #25-#38 of the company “The Hammers Rail System”. The most heavily loaded trains from the list are train engine #25 (a 2-8-0 Consolidation hauling 6 wagons filled with goods to Middlesbrough), train engine #28 (a 4-2-2 Iron Duke hauling 2 wagons filled with goods and 4 wagons with food to Newscastle-Upon-Tyne), train engine #29 (another 4-2-2 Iron Duke hauling one passenger wagon, one dining wagon, one mail wagon, one wagon with goods, one wagon with food and one wagon with iron to Newcastle-Upon-Tyne), train engine #31 (a 2-4-0 Vulcan hauling two passenger wagons, one dining wagon, one mail wagon, two wagons filled with wool to Dundalk), train engine #33 (a 2-4-0 Vulcan hauling one passenger wagon, one dining wagon, two wagons filled with goods, two wagons with food to Rhondda) and train engine #35 (a 4-2-2 Iron Duke hauling two passenger wagons, one dining wagon, one milk wagon and two wagons with wool to Dundalk).

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In the image below, we can see the brand new 3-Truck Shay leaving Dublin in November 1887.

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Cambridge Bullet 01 was getting very close to London Train Museum in November 1887, and train engine #6 (a 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) was carrying three wagons of steel to London at the same time.

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In November 1887, train engine #34 (a 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) suffered another breakdown. Its first breakdown occurred in June 1886. This is shocking considering this train engine is among the newest in the fleet of T.H.R.S., having been in service for only 2 years.

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In the image above we can see train engines #4-#17 of T.H.R.S. in November 1887.

Train engine #17 (a 4-2-2 Iron Duke) was unloading four passenger wagons and one mail wagon at Norwich.

To be continued…

Britain – 1886 – 1887 – Will Isambard Kingdom Brunel lose control of his company T.H.R.S.? (VI)

In August 1887, London Zephyr 01 was travelling on route London-Oxford.

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With a breakdown chance per year of 5.2% (grown 400% after 17 years of use), this train engine was sent to London Train Museum (for a temporary retirement).

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In the image below, we can see four train engines belonging to the company “The Hammers Rail System”, a small part of the city of London and the station “London Train Museum”. Train engine #13 (a 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) was transporting three wagons of iron to London. Train engine #14 (a 4-2-2 Iron Duke) was transporting two wagons of grain to the same city. Train engine #9 (another 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) was transporting three passenger wagons, a dining wagon, goods and food to Oxford. Also, there was a 2-8-0 Consolidation blocked behind train engine #13.

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In the image below we can see the list of train engines #1 – #14 in September 1887.

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Considering that T.H.R.S. had in October 1887 cash of 25 million dollars, Isambard Kingdom Brunel decided to expand Northern Ireland’s railroad network, building train stations in Dublin and Kildare.

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Unfortunately, only Dublin was big enough to sustain a train station commercially and financially.

Kildare was just a village that recently had been elevated to “town status”.

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The train station Dublin was supplied immediately after its inauguration with four passenger wagons, one mail wagon, one milk wagon and one food wagon.

Dublin was the first train station built after “London Train Museum”.

With a brand new station, T.H.R.S. had to increase its fleet of train engines. There were indeed fewer train engines in Ireland than on the main island of Britain.

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Isambard Kingdom Brunel chose this time to purchase a brand new 3-Truck Shay. It is interesting that at this point in time, only two of this type of engines existed in Britain.

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To be continued…

Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (V)

In March 1887, Napoleon III bought 1,000 shares of the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail”. Train engine #1 (a 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) was hauling two mail wagons to Nimes, while train engine #2 (another 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) was heading to Marseille Junction without cargo.

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In the image above and the image below we can see the beautiful city of Barcelona while train engines #1-#8 are checked by Adolph von Hansemann.

Train engine #7 (a 2-8-0 Consolidation) was in customs at Barcelona Station.

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In March 1887, Adolph von Hansemann owned 19,000 shares of 1880MR, Gerson von Bleichroder owned 6,000 shares of the same company, Napoleon III was the third shareholder with 2,000 shares and other investors owned 174,000 shares.

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In March 1887, a new train engine (type 2-8-0 Consolidation) was purchased by the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” for the route La Rochelle – Bordeaux – Toulouse.

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Train engine #10 (a 4-2-2 Iron Duke) was waiting for cargo at Montpellier Station.

In the image below, we can see the city of Paris, where a 4-4-0 8-Wheeler belonging to the company “Besancon Western” was arriving in May 1887, hauling one mail wagon and two passenger wagons.

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In the image below we can see two train engines (type 4-4-0 8-Wheeler) belonging to the company “Besancon Western” near the city of Dijon in May 1887.

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In the image below (taken in July 1887) we can see La Rochelle Station and two trains belonging to the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” (a 2-4-0 Vulcan heading to La Rochelle and a 2-8-0 Consolidation on its way to Bordeaux).

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To be continued…

Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (IV)

The Annual Report for 1886 came in the first week of January 1887.

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With revenues of 2.46 million dollars and profits of 1.39 million dollars, the investors were “somewhat pleased” with Adolph von Hansemann’s performance.

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The board of directors increased von Hansemann’s salary by 1,000 dollars to 46,000 dollars/year.

The company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” had the biggest revenue in Mediterranean region, but the 4th in the world, according to “Global Financial Railroad Companies Guide”:

  1. The Hammers Rail System – 5,435,000 dollars
  2. Southampton Eastern – 3,990,000 dollars
  3. Liverpool & Manchester – 3,774,000 dollars
  4. 1880 Mediteranean Rail – 2,468,000 dollars
  5. Besancon Western – 1,107,000 dollars
  6. Iron Duke Engines LTD. – 458,000 dollars
  7. Lyon & St-Etienne – 403,000 dollars
  8. Consolidation Engines Holding – 233,000 dollars
  9. Multi-Wheelers Co. – 190,000 dollars
  10. Vulcan Engines Co. – 144,000 dollars
  11. Shay Engines LTD. – 20,000 dollars

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Adolph von Hansemann was poorer than Gerson von Bleichroder but still richer than Napoleon III.

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In February 1887, train engine #7 that crashed in December 1886 was still registered in the catalogue of 1880MR.

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Gerson von Bleichroder bought 1,000 shares of the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” in February 1887.

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Finally, the remains of the crashed engine and the confiscated wagons were taken out of the path of the functional trains.

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Train engines #8 – #13 of 1880MR were renamed to #7 – #12.

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To be continued…

Mediterranean – 1886 – 1887 – 23 train engines (III)

August 1886: The company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” had 11 train engines – 6 x 4-2-2 Iron Duke, 2 x 4-4-0 8-Wheeler, 2 x 2-8-0 Consolidation and one 2-4-0 Vulcan.

In the image below we can see the area around the city of Nimes, with the famous “3 railroad crossroads” triangle.

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In October 1886, the company “1880 Mediteranean Rail” purchased a new 2-8-0 Consolidation which started its travels at Murcia in Spain.

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In December 1886, “1880MR” had a train wreck and lost the transport of one passenger wagon (coupled with a dining wagon), two oil wagons and two produce wagons.

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It was the first time in 16 years since the first 4-2-2 Iron Duke was bought that something like that happened. And it wasn’t an old train engine – it was just 2 years old.

Unfortunately, it seems the steep hills of eastern Spain aged this engine very fast – or maybe the company “Iron Duke Engines LTD.” delivered a flawed product – this is something that will be investigated by Adolph von Hansemann, the CEO of “1880 Mediteranean Rail”.

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However, a new train engine (a 2-8-0 Consolidation) was purchased and given a provisional number (#13). It hauled 3 passenger wagons, one dining wagon and one mail wagon from Barcelona to Valencia.

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In the image above you can see the original train engine #7 of “1880MR” burning after the crash.

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This crashed 4-2-2 Iron Duke had in its short lifetime a revenue of 307,000 dollars with a profit of 211,000 dollars.

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The Spanish authorities didn’t allow either the replacement or the retirement of the crashed engine, in fact the 6 wagons (the dining wagon included) were confiscated for further research in determining the cause of the crash.

The reputation of the company that owned the train engine (“1880 Mediteranean Rail”) decreased in Spain and a little in France, while the company that produced the train engine (“Iron Duke Engines LTD.”) suffered big losses at the stock markets in London, Paris and Madrid.

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To be continued…